2019 MGS Conference – April 12, 2019

THE FUTURE OF AGING: Rethink · Reimagine · Redesign
Earle Brown Heritage Center – Brooklyn Center, MN

SPONSOR and EXHIBITOR OPPORTUNITIES

Poster Submission Application – deadline March 1

Register for the Conference          Download the Conference Program

Conference Overview

7:00 – 8:00 am    Registration, Continental Breakfast, Exhibit Hall Opens
8:00 – 8:30 am    Welcome, MGS Gerontologist of the Year Award
8:30 – 9:30 am    Keynote Address
–          “Quality Long-Term Care: How Research and Innovation
          Lead to Better Outcomes (or Not)” 

          Vincent Mor, PhD, University of Minnesota Robert L. Kane Memorial Lecturer, –          Professor of Health Sciences, Policy and Practice at Brown University
9:30 – 10:00 am    Exhibit Hall; Healing/Relaxation Sessions; Networking
10:00 – 11:15 am  Concurrent Sessions (A: 1-6)
11:15 – 11:30 am   Break
11:30 – 12:15 pm   Luncheon: MGS Scholarship Awards; Raffles
12:15 – 1:30 pm      Luncheon Panel – “Future Visions for Minnesota Aging Services”
–     Moderator: Joe Gaugler, PhD, UMN Kane Endowed Chair in Long Term Care & Aging
        Roberta Meyers, MD, President – MN Association of Geriatrics Inspired Clinicians
–        Pahoua Yang Hoffman, MBA, Executive Director, Citizens League

        Gayle Kvenvold, MSW, President/CEO, LeadingAge Minnesota
1:30 – 2:00 pm    Exhibit Hall; Healing/Relaxation Sessions; Networking
2:00 – 3:15 pm    Concurrent Sessions (B: 1-6)
3:15 – 3:30 pm    Break
3:30 – 4:30 pm    Concurrent Sessions (C: 1-6)
4:30 – 5:00 pm    Raffles

Qualifies for 6 CEUs by BOSW (approved) and BENHA (pending)

Registration Details

MGS Member Conference Discount: A new or renewing membership with conference registration saves up to $100 off the non-member rate. You can join or renew on the conference registration form. Membership must be active on April 12, 2019.
(Annual Memberships: Professional- $75; Retired- $40; Student- $30)

Conference Registration Rates
Early-bird: by March 21                                   After March 21
Member-Professional  $105                              Member-Professional  $160
Non-Member                $205                              Non-Member                 $260
Member-Retired           $80                                Member-Retired            $125
Non-Member-Retired  $155                              Non-Member-Retired   $200
Student – Full-time       $50                                Student – Full-time        $60
Lunch Program only    $40                                 Lunch Program only     $45

Register for the Conference

Donate to Sponsor a Student: Please consider adding $50 to your registration to pay for a college student’s registration. There is a donation area on the registration form.
Group Registration Discounts: Available for groups of 5 or more registering together from the same organization. Contact info@mngero.org
Partial Conference Discounts:
 A limited number of partial discounts are available for low/moderate income individuals. To apply contact info@mngero.org
Student Scholarships
: Student scholarships are available for full-time higher education students. These are made possible from individual donations and sponsored by the Minnesota Association of Area Agencies on Aging.
To apply contact info@mngero.org
Hotel Accommodations:
Click here for several hotel options, including a special MGS rate at the Embassy Suites Minneapolis North attached to the Earle Brown conference center.

Program Details
General Sessions and Exhibits:

7:00 am – 2:00 pm       Exhibit Hall

8:00 – 8:30 am    Welcome, About MGS, Gerontologist of the Year Award

8:30 – 9:30 am: Keynote Address:
“Quality Long-Term Care: How Research and Innovation Lead to Better Outcomes (or Not)” 
Vincent Mor, PhD, Florence Pirce Grant University Professor, Professor of Health Services, Policy and Practice at Brown University
The Robert L. Kane Memorial Lecture is sponsored by the University of Minnesota’s Robert L. Kane Endowed Chair in LTC and Aging. This prestigious Lectureship features national and international scholars who excel in researching quality long term care and strive to improve our nation’s health care delivery systems. In addition to an academic presentation that is held at the University of Minnesota, the holder of the Robert L. Kane Memorial Lectureship provides a presentation to providers, policymakers, and similar community stakeholders.
Dr. Mor’s research focuses on the organizational and health care delivery system factors associated with variation in use of health services and the outcomes frail and chronically ill persons experience. He has been Principal Investigator of over 30 NIH funded grants focusing on the organizational and health care delivery system factors to improve the experiences and outcomes for frail and chronically ill persons. He holds the Merit Award from NIA for his research.

12:15 – 1:30 pm: Luncheon Panel – “Future Visions for Minnesota Aging Services”

Moderator: Joe Gaugler, PhD, UMN Kane Endowed Chair in Long-Term Care & Aging
Roberta Meyers, MD, President – MN Association of Geriatrics Inspired Clinicians
Pahoua Yang Hoffman, MBA, Executive Director, Citizens League
Gayle Kvenvold, MSW, President/CEO, LeadingAge Minnesota

Concurrent Sessions

TRACK 1

ETHICS,
DIVERSITY
TRACK 2

AGING IN
PLACE
TRACK 3

CAREERS,
POLICY,
RESEARCH
TRACK 4

HEALTH,
MENTAL HEALTH
TRACK 5

PERSONAL
PERSPECTIVES
TRACK 6

RURAL
COMMUNITY
SOLUTIONS
10:00 AM1A.
Gay & Gray:
Ethics in Serving
LGBT Older Adults
2A.
Smart Home Technology: Enhancing Independent Living
3A.
Careers in Aging:
Gerontologists Wanted NOW
4A.
Elder Abuse Prevention: A Public Health Approach
5A.
Shaping My Story: Diverse Personal Perspectives
6A.
Working Caregivers
in Rural Minnesota:
A New Model
2:00 PM1B.
American Indian
Elders: Need for Cultural Sensitivity
in Health Care and Services
2B.
Rethinking Aging
in Place: Home Rehab Costs and Necessary
Resources
3B.
Aging Policy and Services Initiatives: Federal, State,
Community
4B.
Challenges - Solutions to Mental Health Services for Older Adults
5B.
Aging:
Perspectives
from
Memoirs
and Poems
6B.
Technology Supported
Innovations for All Ages: A Community
Model
3:30 PM1C.
Ethical Considerations:
Determining Mental Capacity for Personal
Autonomy
2C.
Healing Power of Nature: Enhancing Spaces Inside & Out
3C.
POSTERS
Cutting Edge
Research
4C.
Meeting the
Opioid
Challenge:
Impact on
Older Adults
5C.
Words Matter!
What Does “Senior” Mean to You?
6C.
Reducing Unnecessary Hospitalization of Rural Nursing Home Residents

Concurrent Sessions     A: 10:00 – 11:15 am

 

1A – Gay and Gray: Ethics in Serving LGBT Older Adults

Jane Danner, MA, LSW, Director, Resident Engagement and Development, Volunteers of America
Rajean Paul Moone, PhD, Executive Director, Training to Serve
Robert F. Rode, Esq., Partner, Voigt, Rode`, and Boxeth
An overview of issues regarding the LGBT aging community. This session will increase service provider awareness about the diversity of sexual orientation and gender identity among senior clients and the ethical dilemmas providers may encounter. Information will be shared to help organizations become more LGBT culturally competent and welcoming.

Objectives:

  • Increase awareness of potential ethical issues related to caring for LGBT older adults.
  • Increase knowledge of options for resolution for ethical dilemmas.
  • Increase awareness of needs of LGBT older adults and how to be an inclusive provider.

 

2A – Smart Home Technology: Enhancing Independent Living

Karen M Sames, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Professor, Occupational Therapy, St. Catherine University
Kimberly Barrett, Assured Living Project Manager, Best Buy Corp.
Pennie Viggiano, VP Home and Community Based Services Benedictine Health Services
Jennifer Hutson, MA, OT/L, Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy, St. Catherine University
Skye Thompson, BS, OTS, Research Assistant: St. Catherine University
A team of researchers partnered to study the impact of using smart home technologies by seniors living independently. This presentation will include a brief review of the literature around smart home technology as well as a summary of the research methodology, results, and implications for the future. Participants will see and try out the technology and interact with the research team.
Objectives:

  • Describe smart home technologies and what they can do.
  • Understand the implications of using smart home technologies from the perspective of senior adults and their families.
  • Describe the results of a year-long study on the use of smart home technologies with seniors in independent living.

 

3A – Careers in Aging: Gerontologists Wanted NOW

Phyllis Greenberg, PhD, MPA, Coordinator, Graduate Studies in Gerontology, St. Cloud State University
Sue Humphers-Ginther, PhD, Chair, Social & Criminal Justice Dept., Gerontology Program
Coordinator, Minnesota State University Moorhead
This interactive panel will share insights on steps that students, new professionals in aging and those looking to make as career shift can take to market themselves or further their careers in the aging network. Topics include: current gerontology programs, types and range of possible careers, ideas on how and where to network, and how students who have successfully obtained jobs overcame barriers.

Objectives:

    • Describe the multiplicity of careers that would either benefit from gerontological expertise or directly address the needs and preferences of older adults.
    • Describe the scope of educational opportunities in gerontology available in Minnesota.
    • Describe strategies to bridge gerontology education and practice.

 

4A – Elder Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation Prevention: A Public Health Approach

Marit Anne Peterson, JD, Program Director, Minnesota Elder Justice Center
Sean Burke, JD, Policy Director, Minnesota Elder Justice Center
Kathryn Behrens, MPH, Prevention and Outreach Coordinator, Minnesota Elder Justice Center

A close examination and discussion of primary prevention models applied to elder abuse, neglect and exploitation. The goal is to more closely identify and associate these prevention strategies with the language we use to talk about this issue. Much work has been done to understand domestic violence, while less policy and research attention is focused on older victims in a preventative context.
Objectives:

  • Identify the basic elements of a what a public health approach to preventing elder abuse entails.
  • Discuss various public health intervention approaches that have been used in other violence prevention contexts.
  • Analyze what public health approaches may be applicable to the prevention of elder abuse, neglect, and financial exploitation.

 

5A – Shaping My Story: Diverse Personal Perspectives

Moderator: Patti Cullen, President/CEO, Care Providers of MN
Panel: TBD

 A panel of seniors of various age, gender, race and culture respond to the core question: “What is essential to maintain a meaningful life as we age”? They discuss needed public policy changes to move closer to meeting their needs/wants. While market research plays a role in development plans, do professionals really ask the broader population of seniors, especially from diverse cultures, “What is essential to maintain a meaningful life?”
Objectives:

  • Understand different expectations and concerns expressed by seniors from culturally diverse populations.
  • Describe public policy changes that should be made to better address needs and wants of seniors.
  • Identify what professional practice changes could be made today to address consumer expectations.

 

6A – Working Caregivers in Rural Minnesota: A New Model

Carrie Henning-Smith, PhD, MPH, MSW, Deputy Director, Rural Health Research Center, UMN
Megan Lahr, MPH, Research Fellow, Rural Health Research Center, UMN
Catherine Blonigen, Board Chair, Grace Innovations

Research and interviews with experts provide evidence on the importance of focusing on new models of support to address the unique challenges to sustaining employed caregivers in rural areas. Grace Innovations will present a new integrated model of providing supportive services to employed caregivers which includes partnering with employers and engaging community stakeholders. Purpose: to improve the health and wellbeing of rural caregivers and their clients.
Objectives:

  • Analyze rural-urban differences in supportive services for employed caregivers.
  • Identify the importance of new models of support to address unique challenges to sustaining employed caregivers in rural areas.
  • Learn about a new model of providing supportive services to employed caregivers with the objective of improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers and those they care for.

Concurrent Sessions      B: 2:00 – 3:15 pm

 

1B American Indian Elders: Need for Cultural Sensitivity in Health Care and Services

Linda Bane Frizzell, PhD, MS, Faculty, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota

The health status of American Indian elders has continued to decline every year since records have been kept in 1955. There is a critical need for culturally sensitive/attuned health service providers, who have abilities to respect elders and collaborate with families in a “holistic” approach that had been used for centuries by indigenous peoples, to provide the highest quality and effective services possible.
Objectives:

  • Learn the basis of health services for American Indians, which are quite different than the public sector.
  • Learn about the traumatic governmental influences experienced by American Indian elders.
  • Discuss the need for improved understanding of the diversity of American Indian elders to reduce unknowing cultural oppression and subconscious racism.

 

2B – Rethinking Aging in Place: A Study on Home Rehab Costs and Necessary Resources

Michelle Decker Gerrard, M.Ed., Senior Research Manager, Wilder Research
Cael Warren, Ph.D. Candidate, Research Scientist, Wilder Research
Christin Lindberg, M.A., C.P.G., Research Associate, Wilder Research

Wilder Research conducted a study to better understand the home rehabilitation and service needs of extremely low-income older adult homeowners who want and are capable of aging-in-place. The ability to age in place is complex and depends on adequate financial resources, along with housing that accommodates the physical needs of older adults.
Objectives:

  • Describe the circumstances and context for barriers faced by older adults who wish to maintain a home and live safely and independently.
  • Share cost comparisons of home-based and facility-based strategies that can meet older adults’ needs.
  • Discuss effective strategies for pairing home rehabilitation and in-home services that can reduce the likelihood of institutionalization.

 

3B – Aging Policy and Service Delivery Initiatives: Federal, State, Community

Jim Varpness, MPA, Retired Regional Director, US Department of Health & Human Services
Minnesota Board on Aging – representative TBD
Lori Vrolson, MS, President, MGS: Executive Director, Central MN Council on Aging

Older Minnesotans and their caregivers often utilize long-term services and supports (LTSS) such as meal delivery, adult day services, or support groups to maintain independence and manage health care needs. This session will review federal, state and local policies and service delivery models, and explore existing gaps in services. Insights on our changing views of how LTSS will be provided in the future and implications for how these services are funded will also be discussed.
Objectives:

  • Review federal and state legislation and policies for aging services.
  • Discuss the effectiveness of state and community service delivery models.
  • Identify gaps in services and needed changes in current policies and statutes.

 

4B Challenges and Solutions to Mental Health Services for Older Adults

Chris Rosenthal, LISW, Director of Aging and Disability Service, Jewish Family Service of St. Paul
Shannon Nixon, MA, MFA, Psychotherapist and Art Therapist, Jewish Family Service of St. Paul
Kaci Christnovich MA, Mental Health Practitioner, Jewish Family Service of St. Paul
Beth Johnson, LMFT, Jewish Family Service of St. Paul
Rachel Potter, LSW, MSW Intern, Jewish Family Service of St. Paul

 Challenges for effective mental health services include: not enough trained providers, stigma, lack of transportation, and restrictive reimbursement. These barriers limit creative therapeutic interventions. A panel of experts will share their recent experiences and outcomes with innovative mental health interventions, including tele-counselling, delivered to older adults in their homes.
Objectives:

  • Identify barriers and challenges to providing mental health services for older adults.
  • Describe therapeutic mental health interventions delivered in-home to address depression in older adults.
  • Learn about the preliminary challenges and successes of a new tele-health counselling program for older adults.

 

5B – Aging: Perspectives from Memoirs and Poems

Ted Bowman, MDiv, Family and Grief Educator, Adjunct Instructor, University of St. Thomas

Insights about present and future aging can be found in memoirs and poetry. Further, stories of aging and poetry can enrich work with elders and their families. Accounts from the written word will be used to demonstrate the present and future of aging and suggest ways of addressing joys and concerns. Stories evoke stories. Hence, the use of literary prompts can lead to writing, speaking, recalling, affirming and envisioning aging.
Objectives:

  • Distinguish similarities and differences in the stories told by clients and those found in memoir and poetry.
  • Describe multiple ways literary prompts about aging can be used in practice.
  • Name ways stories can be used for empowerment, modeling, and shifting from a reactive to a proactive approach when working with elders.

 

6B – Technology Supported Innovations for All Ages: A Community Model

Dona J. Wishart, Executive Director, Otsego County, MI Commission on Aging
Joel M. Ackerman, Founder and CEO, CommunO2 (Community Oxygen)

A Minnesota developed community support platform for older adults, persons with disabilities and family caregivers currently being implemented, community-wide in Flint, Traverse City, and Gaylord Michigan; several Minnesota communities are exploring being next.  The program, including initially 75 organizations, is free to all consumers and provides technology for better connecting people with each other, social services, government and health care. Opportunities for replicating in Minnesota will be presented.
Objectives:

  • Describe an integrated, community-wide healthy aging program that is creating a community standard for interpersonal engagement, decreased isolation, and enhanced family and organizational supports.
  • Discuss the 5 key criteria that any new technology or innovation must address to be embraced by consumers and, in particular, older adults and family caregivers.
  • Explore the potential for integrating health and human services using this Minnesota-grown technology and aging intervention.

 

Concurrent Sessions      C: 3:30 – 4:30 pm

 

1C – Ethical Considerations: Determining Mental Capacity for Personal Autonomy

Karen Reimers, MD, Psychiatrist, Expert Consultant, Assist. Adjunct Professor, UMN

Mental health professionals are increasingly asked to render opinions about an older person’s mental capacity to make decisions about self-care and finances. Special assessment techniques are needed to explore decision making capacity of older people and avoid potential elder financial exploitation. This interactive workshop will explore ethical considerations in geriatric forensic evaluations, emphasizing best practices for referral and assessment of older patients.
Objectives:

  • Describe special assessment techniques used to evaluate decision making capacity in older adults.
  • Discuss ethical challenges related to decision making capacity in older adults.
  • Identify risk factors and red flags for elder abuse and financial exploitation of older people.

 

2C – Healing Power of Nature: Enhancing Spaces Inside and Out

David Motzenbecker, PLA, ASLA, ANFT, Certified Forest Therapy Guide, Motz Studios LLC
Carole J. Hyder, MA, Integrative Spaces and Feng Shui Expert, Hyder Enterprises Inc

Integrating nature into the design of care facilities, hospitals, senior living apartments, homes and offices can provide a myriad of health benefits. Participants will be introduced to enhancing harmony and balance from both biophilic design studies as well as the ancient practice of Feng Shui. These two modalities work in tandem to create healthy spaces.
Objectives:

  • Understand the qualities of a healing environment from both the biophilic and Feng Shui perspective.
  • Identify specific actions that can be taken to create an integrative space.
  • Learn about the evidence-based studies on the contribution of a space toward healing and well-being.

 

3C – Poster Session – Cutting Edge Aging-Related Research

The Poster Session is a display of presentations representing gerontology and aging-related research by practicing professionals, faculty, and higher education students. This session offers attendees an opportunity to learn about current and emerging research and engage in one-to-one discussions with researchers about their project findings as well as implications toward policy initiatives, improvements in care delivery, and best practices when working with older adults. In this session, each researcher will briefly present on his/her topic. Then, participants can mingle among the posters and engage in more in-depth dialogs about the research topics and findings.

The specific list of poster topics/presenters will be outlined in the conference program.
 

4C – Meeting the Opioid Challenge: Impact on Older Adults

Madelyn Atol, PharmD, BCACP, Clinical Pharmacist, HealthPartners
Tammy Chambers BS, RN, Clinical Quality Consultant, HealthPartners

Seniors use more prescription and over the counter medications than younger age groups. They are subsequently at higher risk for drug-drug interactions with opioids, and some signs of overdose or abuse can mimic the natural aging process. The New Chronic User (NCU) measure was developed by DHS as a useful clinical outcome measure to support quality improvement efforts in preventing chronic opioid use.  Training on implementing safety protocols into clinical practice can be an important step in reducing the impact in the elderly population.
Objectives:

  • Identify at least three unique characteristics of the senior population that predisposes them to be more vulnerable to opioid medication abuse and misuse.
  • Understand how the New Chronic User measure supports quality improvement in the prevention of chronic opioid use.
  • Identify at least two safety protocols that can be implemented into clinical practices or senior care settings.

 

5C – Words Matter! What Does “Senior” Mean to You?

Deb Taylor, MPNA, CEO, Senior Community Services
Jon Burkhow, Director of HOME and Senior Partners Care Programs, Senior Community Services
Allison Bendickson, Director of Development, Senior Community Services

 Professionals need to pay attention to what the Frameworks Institute research is saying about the word “Senior”, which has a negative connotation for many. Attendees will be engaged in a discussion about how to best reach people who need services with language that resonates with them. Through reframing and reimagining, positive ways to talk and think about aging will be explored.
Objectives:

  • Discuss the importance of the words we use and how we communicate with people of all ages and generations.
  • Present and discuss the external and internal research findings surrounding the words we use when discussing aging.
  • Identify better ways to discuss aging that will engage people of all ages.

 

6C – Reducing Unnecessary Hospitalization of Rural Nursing Home Residents

Cami Peterson-DeVries, DHA, RN, MSN, Regional Director, St. Francis Health Services

An open discussion and review of research conducted with rural nursing home providers on possible solutions to address unnecessary hospitalizations. We understand that unnecessary hospitalizations continue to occur. Multiple factors influence a provider’s decision to send a resident to the hospital. These can include unclear advance-directive information, a provider’s lack of knowledge/information about resident and family wishes, or unknown/unavailable nursing home services and processes. There are many opportunities to work collaboratively to address the problem and improve the care of the older adult.
Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding on barriers that may cause an older adult to be sent to the hospital unnecessarily in rural communities.
  • Discuss the role and responsibility of all providers in addressing the problem of unnecessary hospitalizations.
  • Identify methods to work collaboratively in addressing older adult hospitalizations.

Register for the Conference

Conference Objectives: Qualifies for 6 CEUs by BOSW (approved) and BENHA (pending)

  1. Explore the future of aging in Minnesota, and consider ways to rethink, reimagine, and redesign long-term care service delivery.
  2. Discuss the effects of innovative strategies and research on health outcomes for persons living in long-term care facilities.
  3. Recognize the needs of diverse populations and how to meet them with cultural awareness.
  4. Identify strategies to address the needs of older adults living in rural communities.
  5. Understand the challenges and solutions to serving older adults with mental health needs.

Disclaimer: MGS does not necessarily endorse or hold ownership of any specific subject content, product, provider or presenter featured in its webinars or conference programs.